1. Kristin Denault
  2. http://www.igert.org/profiles/4714
  3. Graduate Student
  4. Presenter’s IGERT
  5. University of California at Santa Barbara
  1. John Cowart
  2. http://www.igert.org/profiles/4767
  3. IGERT Alum
  4. Presenter’s IGERT
  5. University of California at Santa Barbara
  1. Nathan George
  2. http://www.igert.org/profiles/3897
  3. Graduate Student
  4. Presenter’s IGERT
  5. University of California at Santa Barbara
  1. Michele Guide
  2. http://www.igert.org/profiles/4757
  3. Graduate Student
  4. Presenter’s IGERT
  5. University of California at Santa Barbara

Judges’ Queries and Presenter’s Replies

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Presentation Discussion
  • May 21, 2012 | 11:16 p.m.

    Good work on your poster. It was very informative. Even though its not my field, I think you did a nice job with your explanation.

    I guess the main question I had is the following. What is the main take away message? You could restate this question by asking: what was the objective or hypothesis that your poster tried to address? Finally, if you combine all your results into a story, how is improved efficiency achieved?

  • Icon for: Michele Guide

    Michele Guide

    Co-Presenter
    May 22, 2012 | 03:07 p.m.

    I would say the common thread is that we are all studying structure-property-function relationships in materials, and in these very interdisciplinary fields, it’s like a feedback loop. We focus on different aspects of synthesis, device fabrication or characterization and take what we learn from our individual studies to feed into the whole cycle. If I determine through nanoscale characterization that I need a fullerene with a certain physical structure to induce a certain type of morphology in a bulk heterojunction solar cell, then JJ gets some useful information about what kind of fullerene syntheses he may want to focus on. Then I work with those new materials and the cycle continues. We take an accumulation of fundamental physical and chemical lessons to accomplish the very practical goal of improved efficiency.

  • May 22, 2012 | 12:17 p.m.

    This is not my area of expertise but looks like an excellent set of projects that could really make a difference in this world. Improving energy efficiency with resources that are not limiting is a key challenge we face as a nation, as well as globally. Good luck with your projects!

  • Icon for: Michael Haibach

    Michael Haibach

    Trainee
    May 22, 2012 | 05:39 p.m.

    Nice Is YAG:Ce available/cheap enough to be used on the home-lighting scale? How much of a concern is the cost of the new phosphor materials that you are designing?

  • Small default profile

    William Paxton

    Guest
    May 29, 2012 | 02:24 p.m.

    Great job!

  • Further posting is closed as the competition has ended.