Judges’ Queries and Presenter’s Replies

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Presentation Discussion

  • Icon for: Brian Drayton

    Brian Drayton

    Faculty
    May 21, 2012 | 09:11 p.m.

    Well, it’s nice that the systems with more competition for power show a stronger positive result — is that “market forces” at work, or representation of more interests in the policy debates, less opportunity for denial, or more investment by more people in constructive participation?

  • Icon for: Micah Gell-Redman

    Micah Gell-Redman

    Presenter
    May 22, 2012 | 07:40 a.m.

    Thanks for the question. The next phase in our project is dedicated to sorting through those alternative explanations. What our results tell us so far is that it’s really something about there being competition for elected office. Understanding the mechanism that links competition to improved health outcomes in a more fine grained way will probably require a different kind of data collection.

  • Icon for: Glenn Page

    Glenn Page

    Evaluator
    May 22, 2012 | 11:52 a.m.

    Greetings Micah – very well done! Are there examples where adaptive capacity to deal with reappearance of malaria – particularly where there was multi-level governance institutions collaborating around the same issue – perhaps where competitive elections actually transformed the governance systems themselves?

  • Icon for: Micah Gell-Redman

    Micah Gell-Redman

    Presenter
    May 22, 2012 | 09:13 p.m.

    Hi Glenn. This is actually the question I’m exploring right now. It turns out that in both the US and Mexico there was a first round of successful malaria control activities followed by a major resurgence. In the US, the resurgence was widespread and occurred about a decade after efforts began. In Mexico, the resurgence was concentrated in a few southern states, after a greater lapse of time. It remains to be tested whether the responsiveness of governments to the reemergence of malaria were shaped by political competition.

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Icon for: Micah Gell-Redman

MICAH GELL-REDMAN

University of California at San Diego, Scripps...
Years in Grad School: 5

A military approach is required: The political logic of disease control on a warming planet

Global warming already poses serious threats to human well being in the form of increased risk of disease. While existing scholarship provides important insights into the public health challenges of climate change (Patz 2005, McMichael 2006) one critical aspect has generally been omitted – the role of politicians and governments in mitigating health risks. My research examines the role of political institutions such as democratic elections in improving health outcomes. My coauthor and I use the example of Mexico to explore the effect of democracy on public health. Ongoing research uses the example of malaria eradication in the Americas to explore the importance of political institutions for addressing climate-sensitive diseases specifically.