Judges’ Queries and Presenter’s Replies

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Presentation Discussion

  • Icon for: Erin Baker

    Erin Baker

    Faculty
    May 22, 2012 | 09:07 a.m.

    Fascinating idea.

  • Icon for: Michael Waite

    Michael Waite

    Presenter
    May 22, 2012 | 05:12 p.m.

    Thanks!

  • Icon for: Rishee Jain

    Rishee Jain

    Trainee
    May 22, 2012 | 10:31 a.m.

    Super cool Mike! How do you see wind power being integrated with the potential use of solar thermal technologies for DHW?

  • Icon for: Michael Waite

    Michael Waite

    Presenter
    May 22, 2012 | 05:15 p.m.

    Thanks! I think it is part of an integrated approach. The challenge in a dense urban area like NYC is that the solar “catchment area” is relatively small compared to the occupied floor area of buildings – same issue as building-mounted PV. But, it would be really interesting to look into this more, especially to see how the balance between solar-thermal and heat pumps would at different urban density levels.

  • Icon for: Tykeia Robinson

    Tykeia Robinson

    Coordinator
    May 22, 2012 | 01:16 p.m.

    This looks fantastic Mike! Great work.

  • Icon for: Michael Waite

    Michael Waite

    Presenter
    May 22, 2012 | 05:15 p.m.

    Thanks!

  • Icon for: Cory Budischak

    Cory Budischak

    Trainee
    May 22, 2012 | 04:20 p.m.

    Mike,

    Demand management is going to be crucial in a future energy system and I am glad that you are working on this problem. Have you thought of incorporating heat storage in buildings themselves through ice storage or in ceramic or gravel material? Some of these ideas can be seen in this paper.

    G. T. Bellarmine, “Load management techniques,” in Proceedings of the IEEE SoutheastCon 2000. “Preparing for The New Millennium” (Cat. No.00CH37105), 2000, pp. 144.

  • Icon for: Michael Waite

    Michael Waite

    Presenter
    May 22, 2012 | 05:19 p.m.

    Hi Corey – Thanks for the paper and comments! I am interested in investigating many storage options. Ice storage is definitely an interesting one in buildings with high daytime cooling loads. Some of the “advanced” materials approaches you mention are also really interesting. It’s also really interesting to see the compounding effects of different technologies with their own individual advantages when used in combination.

  • Further posting is closed as the competition has ended.

Icon for: Michael Waite

MICHAEL WAITE

Columbia University
Years in Grad School: 1

Increasing Wind Power Utilization Using Electric Heat Pumps For Domestic Hot Water, Thermal Storage And Space Heating

Although wind power is a renewable resource available in many parts of the country, it is intermittent and not typically aligned with electricity demands. As such, large-scale energy storage is generally required to improve the utilization of the wind-generated electricity. Traditional energy storage technologies are expensive and require space, a premium in New York City. Strategies to better align supply and demand profiles and to reduce the need for additional storage are desired. A mathematical model was developed to evaluate the effects of coupling large-scale wind power installations with increased use of electric heat pumps to meet a portion of domestic hot water (DHW) demand. Further, the DHW tank provides a potential energy storage medium when wind-generated electricity exceeds demand. Annual wind energy utilization rates and unit cost reductions were calculated for various wind power capacities and levels of DHW heat pump usage. The effects of using electric heat pumps for space heating were also evaluated in combination with various levels of DHW heat pump penetration.