Judges’ Queries and Presenter’s Replies

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Presentation Discussion

  • Icon for: Joni Falk

    Joni Falk

    Faculty
    May 22, 2012 | 02:50 p.m.

    I am very interested in your poster, particularly in the work on cueing devices to help establish step rhythm for people with Parkinsons. I was wondering if you tried this out on any people with this disease yet? My experience with my mom who suffers from this disease is that she knows that her step lengths are small but yet she can not increase them. There seems to be a disconnect between what her brain wills, and her body’s response. So that leads me to wonder if “knowing” that your stride length is short will help. Of course my experience is with a sample of one. Looking forward to hearing more.

  • Icon for: Arash Tadayon

    Arash Tadayon

    Presenter
    May 30, 2012 | 05:47 a.m.

    Dr. Falk,

    Sorry for my delayed response to your comment, I just barely got back from a trip to Japan. We actually haven’t done any testing yet but plan to carry out some preliminary testing over the summer. There has been prior research done on the use of visual cues and auditory cues to help create a step rhythm that was also targeting step length and rhythm for PD patients and that study (although their sample size was rather small) showed a lot of promise. We are interested in seeing whether we can bridge that disconnect between the mind and body using haptics and touch based feedback that would be like the touch feedback you would get from a physical therapist.

  • Further posting is closed as the competition has ended.

  1. Arash Tadayon
  2. http://www.igert.org/profiles/4671
  3. Graduate Student
  4. Presenter’s IGERT
  5. Arizona State University
  1. Michael Burnam-Fink
  2. http://www.igert.org/profiles/4758
  3. Graduate Student
  4. Presenter’s IGERT
  5. Arizona State University
  1. Eric Luster
  2. http://www.igert.org/profiles/4715
  3. Graduate Student
  4. Presenter’s IGERT
  5. Arizona State University
  1. Heather Pacheco
  2. http://www.igert.org/profiles/4713
  3. Graduate Student
  4. Presenter’s IGERT
  5. Arizona State University

Bringing the Person Back to the Technology: A Paradigm Shift Towards Person-Centeredness in the Design of Assistive, Rehabilitative, Interventional and Preventive Technologies

The “Alliance for Person-centered Assistive Technologies” (APAcT) IGERT was recently awarded to the research partnership of Arizona State University (ASU) and California State University Long Beach (CSULB). The APAcT IGERT brings together teaching and research faculty and graduate students from computer science, engineering, disabilities studies, policy, education, public health, science and technology from ASU and CSULB to implement a novel person-centered approach to research on design, development and application of accessible technologies. Accessible technologies are those designed to support individuals with cognitive and/or physical disabilities in all aspects of their lives. The explicit goals of this IGERT include designing, developing and implementing person-centered technologies and practices in order to ensure that each person with a disability is included as a fully participating member of society. Our presentation highlights the current research projects of the first APAcT IGERT Fellow cohort. This first cohort is comprised of graduate students in computer science, policy and science education. Each project is highly interdisciplinary with implications for policy, business, education, public health, design and technology.